Marcellin College Randwick

Aeterna Non Caduca | The Eternal Not The Transitory

The Lionel Bowen Lecture Series

 

 

WEDNESDAY, 29 AUGUST 2018 - 7.00pm at the College. 

Bookings essential  TRYBOOKINGS - Click here  

 

The inaugural Lionel Bowen Lecture Series in 2014 marked the commencement of an important Marcellin College initiative. In creating this initiative, the College seeks to engage with leading figures in Australian society who have contributed significantly to the common good, and inspire others to emulate their example. The inaugural Lionel Bowen Lecture Series speaker was Mr Jeff McMullen.

The lecture series is a public event open to all in our Marist and Catholic secondary schools network. This is what we want for the young men at Marcellin College – a broadening of their view of the world; an acceptance that with their privileged upbringing they have a responsibility to be good citizens who contribute to the common good. These are the themes that the Lionel Bowen Lecture Series seek to explore.

The lecture series is named in honour of Mr Lionel Bowen, former Deputy Prime Minister of Australia and Old Boy of Marcellin College. Mr Bowen, who passed away in 2012, remains highly regarded for his significant contribution and service to the public at all levels of Government.

In 2017, Jesuit priest and human rights lawyer, Fr Frank Brennan SJ AO was the guest speaker. Fr Frank spoke to parents, staff and students about relevant issues of the day and how they need to be considered through the eyes of the common good. 

The 2018 lecture will be presented by Professor the Hon Bob Carr. Mr Carr was the Premier of New South Wales from 1995 to 2005 and served as Minister for Foreign Affairs from 2012 to 2013.

WEDNESDAY, 29 AUGUST 2018 - 7.00pm at the College. 

 

 


Below: 2014 Inaugural speaker - Mr Jeff McMullen

Mr Jeff McMullen - Lionel Bowen Lecture

Mr Jeff McMullen - Lionel Bowen Lecture


 

The Marcellin Graduate

They arrive as young boys dependent very much on their parents and their teachers; they depart as adults in the eyes of the law. Young men - citizens of the world. There is an impression that the Marcellin boy is cocooned on the eastern side of Anzac Parade. The challenge for him is that he sees beyond that into the broader world. He is a global citizen. He is called to reach out to others, to let go of any preoccupation with self. His destiny is, as
St Marcellin Champagnat foretold, to be a good Christian and good citizen.